TFOS DEWS II: two years on…

In the two years since the Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society second Dry Eye Workshop (TFOS DEWS II) reports were published, most would agree that dry eye disease (DED) is closer to reaching household name status, becoming a disease that’s more widely recognised and acknowledged by clinicians and more readily reported by patients. Where once DED or meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) might have been overlooked or simply disregarded, there is a greater acknowledgement of the critical role the ocular surface condition can play in quality of life, optimising visual quality and surgical outcomes, and much credit should go to TFOS for this paradigm shift.

Opinion: When steroids are not the answer

Here’s the thing many people don’t realise - dry eye is almost universally evaporative regardless of its cause. Even the rare aqueous deficient dry eye...

AM for severe dry eye?

Despite different underlying pathogenic processes, inflammation is a common denominator in dry eye disease (DED), which in turn promotes further damage...

Dry eye: an originalist perspective

Virtually all patients encounter streams of salty water coursing down their cheeks early in life and don’t realise they have more than one type of tears....

Dry eye in practice - does it work?

I set up a new independent optometry practice earlier this year. I knew that it wasn’t going to be easy, but I was confident my clinical experience, business...

Dry eye: the New Zealand impact

It’s been full steam ahead for the Ocular Surface Laboratory (OSL) this year in the wake of TFOS DEWS II, ably assisted by Dr Alex Muntz, who joined the...

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